Trail bunnies

In the morning, and occasionally late evening, I’ve been seeing brown bunnies along the I-90 pedestrian path in Bellevue. They blend in very well with the ground cover. The only reason I’d notice them at all is they freak out at the sight of me on my bike (it happens) and start a mad sprint parallel to my bike. According to other cyclists, if you’re going slow, like less than 10mph, the bunny may attempt to cross in front of your wheel. I’ve had this happen once with a baby bunny and was more concerned that I’d hit the little thing. If I’m moving fast, defined roughly as 20mph or higher, the bunny gives up. Somewhere in the middle, the little thing will race along the bike for a few seconds before making its inevitable turn into the bushes. The babies are cute.

5 thoughts on “Trail bunnies”

  1. I’ll agree with you that the number of bunnies is up. Riding from Totem Lake to Microsoft (RedWest and Millennium) along the Sammamish River Trail, I see at least 1-2 bunnies a day. I missed one that dashed into the grass and another one on the other side of the trail almost got run over by cyclists going the other way. Since they have become more “common” on the trail through Redmond, I’ve dropped my speed and I’m on the watch for them.

  2. On the Sammamish River Trail I often see lots of trail critters in the morning:

    1) Cats who don’t give a #@! that you’re there.
    2) Ducks (I had one freak out and fly into my wheel once)
    3) Roosters
    4) Mice (only seen a few)
    5) Bunnies

  3. Are slugs dotting the trail critters?

    I saw a racoon family on the Bellevue trail. It was late. They didn’t give a #@! that I was there, either.

  4. > slugs

    I see a lot of slugs. I think they’re attracted to the dewiness that settles on the pavement overnight. In areas where the blacktop isn’t shaded, they won’t make it across because they “bake.” Fortunately, this isn’t doesn’t occur much on the Bellevue trail.

    > Sammamish River trail

    That’s got to be an interesting area in the morning because of its proximity to water.

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